(214) 383-5511 | 820 Alma Dr #140, Allen, TX 75013 | Dentist in Allen, TX

Common causes and symptoms of toothache

Proper brushing and regular visits to your dentist are key to good oral health, but toothaches may still develop due to a variety of reasons. This dental issue may be common, but the pain can be overwhelming. Understanding the common causes and symptoms of a toothache will help you get the best treatment and relief from this painful problem. Causes Millions of people will suffer with one or more toothaches in their life, but the cause of each one may be different. For most people, cavities are the initial cause of this ache. Cavities develop from the buildup of leftover food particles and bacteria, which cause plaque and tooth decay. Without treating a cavity, it can become more serious, resulting in an abscessed tooth. An abscess is an infection that has spread from within the tooth pulp and into the root. This infection directly affects the underlying nerves of your teeth, causing intense throbbing and pain in not only the infected tooth, but also the entire mouth, jaw, and head. If you recently had a tooth extraction and are suffering with a toothache, you may have a dry socket. After your extraction, a clot forms over the incision site, preventing further blood loss. If this clot becomes loose, food and bacteria may build up, infecting the socket and surrounding teeth. This is known as a dry socket, which can cause a toothache. Gum disease is also a common cause of a toothache. The buildup of plaque on the teeth and gums can quickly spread, leading to gum disease, tooth decay, and discomfort. While gum disease stems from poor oral...

Will teeth whitening cause tooth sensitivity?

Tooth sensitivity is a common side effect of teeth whitening. It is usually mild and doesn’t last very long. If you experience sensitivity after whitening, you can use toothpaste for sensitive teeth to alleviate the discomfort. Why are Teeth Sensitive after Whitening Treatment? Teeth whitening treatment uses a bleaching agent to remove surface stains from your teeth. In the process, the whitener can penetrate any exposed dentin. Dentin naturally has pores, but it’s generally protected by the tooth enamel. However, most people have some dentin that is exposed, especially around the gum line. The whitening agent may move through the pores in the dentin and stimulate the nerve tissues inside the tooth, causing increased sensitivity. Most whitening agents are slightly acidic, as well, which can cause minor damage to the enamel, increasing the likelihood of sensitivity. Most people—around 80 percent—experience some degree of sensitivity after whitening. In most cases it is mild and disappears in a few days. In some people, usually those who have issues with sensitivity to begin with, it can last a few weeks and be more uncomfortable. What to do for Sensitive Teeth after Whitening If you’re concerned about sensitivity after or during your teeth whitening treatment, talk to our dentist. Some recommendations to reduce sensitivity might include: Take over-the-counter medication such as ibuprofen before your appointment Avoid brushing your teeth immediately after whitening Rinse your mouth with water after treatment Use a desensitizing gel before treatment Use toothpaste for sensitive teeth after treatment Toothpaste for sensitive teeth helps remineralize the enamel and the dentin, plugging the pores to prevent stimulation of the tooth nerves....